Tuesday, June 03, 2008

The Inequalities of equalization

Rebecca Walberg, an analyst with the Frontier Centre for Public Policy, recently had an interesting piece in the Calgary Herald.

Rebecca examines one of the side-effects of equalization payments.

6 comments:

zolton said...

Conservatives want to go back in time to progress a lower state of mind and make the people go blind! And they think their the best, but their just a mess just a product of a system no greater no less.

Iain G. Foulds said...

... Simple... end the principle of economic collectivism- the role of the state forcing money from one citizen to another- and all these policies fade away.

Doretta Wilson said...

Not to mention that SOME provinces (Ontario) can break agreements with Ottawa, especially when it comes to Heritage Canada money that is supposed to pay for French language instruction!

West coast Teddi said...

Zolton - please use the word "they're" correctly. It is short for "they are". "Their" is all about someone's possession.

Maybe all of us their bloggers could quit texting and go back to proper-ly english.

Miles Lunn said...

I would get rid of equalization not because I oppose the principle of it, but rather than helping provinces when they are struggling it seems to just be a political football used by each premier. Instead of bringing Canadians together, it simply tears them apart. Transfer payments can always be adjusted to make up for changes in equalization. At the very least, I would support keeping it if an independent board was appointed and they would decide on it. This would take the politics out of it, which is what is really messing it up.

Iain G. Foulds said...

... Miles... always a thoughtful, well-expressed comment.
... Unfortunately, once a nation begins down the slippery slope of economic collectivism- the philosophy that everyone's income and property is to be considered common property (communism) to be re-distributed by the state- there is no possible objective line to limit this intervention.